Libraries scramble to reflect places they serve

From News & Record

“Jennifer Songster roved the crowded aisles of the small mom-and-pop shop, riffling through books in Khmer, the official language of Cambodia. Outside, the streets of Phnom Penh bustled. The air was thick and humid. Beads of sweat trickled down her face.She hadn’t flown for 20 hours to marvel at Angkor Wat, the largest religious monument in the world, or stroll the white-sand beaches of Sihanoukville. Instead, she spent eight sweltering days in the Cambodian capital on a five-figure shopping trip.Songster works at the Mark Twain Branch of the Long Beach Public Library, home to one of the largest public library collections of Khmer (pronounced Ka-mai) books in the United States. She and fellow librarian Christina Nhek had traveled more than 8,000 miles on a mission that faces libraries across the country: to serve the readers of rapidly changing cities.”

https://www.greensboro.com/life/libraries-scramble-to-reflect-places-they-serve/article_c1de0ff0-ff68-5bb1-afa5-eb534ed88d05.html

Long Beach: So many languages, so few books: Libraries struggle to reflect places they serve

From Los Angeles Times

” Jennifer Songster roved the crowded aisles of the small mom-and-pop shop, riffling through books in Khmer, the official language of Cambodia. Outside, the streets of Phnom Penh bustled. The air was thick and humid. Beads of sweat trickled down her face.She hadn’t flown for 20 hours to marvel at Angkor Wat, the largest religious monument in the world, or stroll the white-sand beaches of Sihanoukville. Instead, she spent eight sweltering days in the Cambodian capital on a five-figure shopping trip.Songster works at the Mark Twain Branch of the Long Beach Public Library, home to one of the largest public library collections of Khmer (pronounced Ka-mai) books in the United States. She and fellow librarian Christina Nhek had traveled more than 8,000 miles on a mission that faces libraries across the country: to serve the readers of rapidly changing cities.”

https://www.latimes.com/la-me-libraries-languages-diversity-2019-story.html

Long Beach Public Library pilots social work internship program

From Signal Tribune

“To better meet the needs of patrons of the Long Beach Public Library (LBPL) who may be experiencing homelessness, mental illness or have substance use challenges, LBPL is partnering with the Department of Health and Human Services to explore models of integrating social work into its existing services.With support from the Health Department’s Trauma and Resiliency-Informed Long Beach (TRI-LB) initiative, LBPL now has two Master’s in Social Work students from California State University Long Beach (CSULB) and the University of Southern California (USC) who are working as interns to connect LBPL patrons with social services including mental health care, legal support, food security benefits and housing resources.”

Long Beach Public Library pilots social work internship program

Long Beach: Library named for former tennis pro Billie Jean King opens

From Fox San Diego

“The grand opening was held Saturday for the Billie Jean King Main Library in Long Beach, which includes space for about 300,000 books along with a Family Learning Center and Veterans Resource Center.The 92,500-square-foot building replaces the Main Library, which closed earlier this year. It also includes the Center for Adaptive Technology, study rooms, meeting rooms, a special collections area, an extensive children’s area with a storytelling space and an art studio.The library will also offer programs in financial planning and becoming a U.S. citizen, job skills training and literacy services.“Today, I’ve come full circle in my return to Long Beach,” King told an audience gathered in front of the library. “Without the people of Long Beach, I never ever would have been able to launch my tennis career and travel the world and have a platform to hopefully make a difference in the lives of others.” King boasted of her ties to the Long Beach community and her attendance at Long Beach Poly High School. “Go Jackrabbits,” she yelled to the enthusiastic crowd.”

Library named for former tennis pro Billie Jean King opens

Learning centers at Long Beach public libraries have many ways to help families

From Press Telegram

“From free one-on-one homework help to crafting job resumes, Family Learning Centers at Long Beach public libraries have myriad ways to help families.Started in 1999, the first Family Learning Center (FLC) was established at the Burnett Neighborhood Library. Since then, FLC has been established at each of the 12 Long Beach public libraries with support from the Long Beach Public Library Foundation. There will even be one located at the new main library opening later this year.“We are excited for the opening of the new main library later this year, which will include a brand-new Family Learning Center with updated technology and materials and seating for 40 patrons,” Kate Azar, the foundation’s executive director, said.”

Learning centers at Long Beach public libraries have many ways to help families

FIRST LOOK: Inside Long Beach’s new library being constructed in Downtown

From Long Beachize

“While focus has homed in on the new Civic Center’s largest buildings—the new City Hall and the new Port of Long Beach headquarters that sit at the northeast corner of Ocean and Magnolia—the most expensive building per square foot is the new Main Library at the southwest corner of Broadway and Pacific.It is also one of the most important investments in the public in recent years as libraries across the nation have shifted from simply being places where one can find books to spaces that harbor technologies (our libraries have spaces that include free 3D printing), disperse accredited diplomas (since 2016, 37 adults have scored their high school diploma through the library), and assist with academic and social success (the library has a program that has children fully literate before kindergarten).The massive, 92,500-square-foot-structure will expound on these services and amenities—much needed, given that despite the development and economic boom centered in Downtown, 43 percent of children living in the area (zip codes 90802 and 90813) live below the poverty level.”

https://lbpost.com/longbeachize/first-look-dtlb-new-main-library/

Long Beach Library Adds Resource For Veterans

From The Grunion

“There are a lot of benefits available to veterans and their families, but many of them are underused,” Alana LaBeaf, senior librarian at the Main Long Beach Library, said.With the launch of the new Veteran Resource Center at the Main Library, LaBeaf said she hopes that will change.“As librarians, we always strive to connect community members with information, but there is a special challenge involved when people aren’t aware that they have an information need,” LaBeaf said.”

http://www.gazettes.com/news/government/long-beach-library-adds-resource-for-veterans/article_24b36658-6d80-11e8-9804-17d5f3978dd3.html