San Benito County: Friends of the Library teaches adults how to read

From Benito Link

“It’s not necessarily true that everyone who walks into the San Benito County Free Library actually knows how to read.Friends of the Library, a nonprofit organization whose volunteers often lobby for the library at government meetings and hold fundraising events, provides reading tutors for adults who are either illiterate or need to improve their reading comprehension skills for a specific goal.County Librarian Nora Conte said the Adult Literacy Program is a feature at many libraries throughout the state. Originally, she said, the program was offered at the San Juan Bautista Library. Soon after coming to the county library in 2006, she applied for state funding. While the amount varies, she said it ranges from $16,000 to $22,000 each year.“That pays for a staff person to run it and we purchase books and materials so individuals can practice their reading and writing skills,” Conte said.”

https://benitolink.com/features/friends-library-teaches-adults-how-read

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Oakland: Supporting school libraries a real no-brainer

From San Francisco Chronicle

” Andrea Kneeland, a teacher librarian in her first year at Frick Impact Academy, had heard students at the middle school in East Oakland weren’t interested in reading.The library, which had been closed for about a decade, reopened the year before Kneeland took the job of cataloging books and interacting with students. Most students at the school were reading years below grade level, she learned. And some students couldn’t even grasp all the letters of the alphabet.But within her first few months of restocking the shelves, Kneeland learned that Frick students were checking out more books than any other Oakland Unified School District middle school.The school was filled with readers, after all.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Supporting-school-libraries-a-real-no-brainer-12910365.php

State librarian visits Davis library

From Davis Enterprise

“The Friends of the Davis Public Library’s Annual Meeting, at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20, will feature state librarian Greg as speaker. The event will be in the Blanchard Room of the Stephens Branch Library, 315 E. 14th St. in Davis. Light refreshments will be served following the meeting.Gov. Jerry Brown appointed Lucas California’s 25th state librarian in May 2014. Previously, Greg was the bureau chief for the San Francisco Chronicle and covered politics and policy at the State Capitol for nearly 20 years. Greg has a degree in communications from Stanford University, a master’s degree in professional writing from the University of Southern California and recently completed his master’s in library and information science at San Jose State University.”

https://www.davisenterprise.com/community/state-librarian-visits-davis-library/

Pacific Grove Library marks anniversary with fundraising campaign

From Monterey Herald

” While the Pacific Grove Library had hoped to mark last Saturday’s 110th anniversary with the commencement of its long-anticipated renovation project, instead the day marked the initiation of a new public campaign designed to raise the additional money needed to complete the plan.Library Director Scott Bauer said original cost estimates for the remodeling were from $750,000 to $1 million. But a more accurate estimate is between $1.2 to 2 million.“The most basic bare bones design was coming in at about $1.2 to 1.3 million,” said Bauer, noting that costs for construction were much higher than originally expected. “The better design that people really wanted was coming in at $2 million.”Still, the new campaign dubbed “110 days of Fundraising” that kicked off at Saturday’s celebration at Pacific Grove’s Jewell Park has seemed to pay off. Bauer said that as of Tuesday, $1.95 million have been raised thanks to additional donations and pledges that came in over the weekend.”

http://www.montereyherald.com/article/NF/20180515/NEWS/180519894

San Francisco: Library’s $3.4M radio frequency technology proposal meets with opposition

From San Francisco Examiner

“The San Francisco Public Library is trying for a second time after more than a decade to convince the Board of Supervisors to provide funding to deploy radio frequency technology in books and other lending materials. But at least one supervisor wants to kill the plan.Supervisor Jeff Sheehy, who serves on the Board of Supervisors Budget and Finance Committee, said Thursday that he intends to make a motion to strike the library’s $3.4 million budget proposal for RFID, pointing to concerns over privacy and other spending priorities like increased security.The library wants to install RFID tags in all lending materials, which emit radio waves that are read by an RFID reader identifying the item.Acting City Librarian Michael Lambert defended the RFID proposal Thursday during a budget committee hearing.”

http://www.sfexaminer.com/librarys-3-4m-radio-frequency-technology-proposal-meets-opposition/

Mountain View: New library director to start in July

From Mountain View Voice

” Mountain View officials have hired a new director to lead the city’s library. Tracy Gray, who currently heads the Sonoma County Library System, will start her new position at Mountain View Library in July. She replaces the current library director Rosanne Macek, who is retiring.”

https://www.mv-voice.com/news/2018/05/14/new-library-director-to-start-in-july

Santa Monica: A Haven for the Homeless

From US News

“James sat camped outside the main branch of the Santa Monica Public Library on a recent sunny day, his meager belongings in a backpack, and explained how his bout of homelessness started: He fell off the roof of a three-story house.”I’m from Kentucky. They gave me every drug under the sun – ‘You’ve got to have this the rest of your life,'” the 54-year-old says, a country twang in his gentle voice. “I got addicted to the drugs – all of ’em.”James says he’s since gotten off the pharmaceuticals, only occasionally smoking a little bit of marijuana for his chronic pain. He says he’s received “plenty of sandwiches” from a local shelter, for which he is “grateful,” but that what he’s needed for several months is a caseworker – someone to help him get an apartment and a part-time job, which he thinks he can manage.Perhaps surprisingly, staff at the library say they’ll be able to connect him with one.James is one of many homeless people who flock to the library in Santa Monica, California – an idyllic, trendy and fast-gentrifying beach community that also serves as a haven for the less fortunate.”

https://www.usnews.com/news/healthiest-communities/articles/2018-05-09/in-santa-monica-california-a-haven-for-the-homeless-seeks-to-do-more