San Jose: Three people owe library more than $10,000 for overdue books

From San Jose Mercury News

” Three people owe the San Jose Public Library more than $10,000 for overdue or lost books, seven more racked up fines totaling more than $5,000 and nearly 130 face penalties of at least $1,000, records obtained by this newspaper show.How book-borrowers could amass such a staggering debt is hard to say — the city refuses to divulge who they are. But San Jose’s highest unpaid individual library fines, as well as the total penalties owed, dwarf those in San Francisco or Oakland.”

http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_29802519/san-jose-three-people-owe-library-more-than

Humboldt: Libraries role as homeless refuges

From Times Standard

“Public libraries have long had a close relationship with the homeless, and Eureka’s downtown main branch is no exception.Humboldt County’s Library Services Director Victor Zazueta acknowledges the crucial role the branch plays, noting a steady stream of people who are homeless to the library’s computer terminals, where they use the Internet to apply for social services and jobs, or just keep up with current events. ”

http://www.times-standard.com/article/NJ/20160423/NEWS/160429933

Chino: Campus adds 1,500 books to library in women’s prison

From UCLA Newsroom

” recent UCLA book drive motivated students, faculty and staff to collect or donate more than 1,500 books for the library of a state women’s prison in Southern California. The first of the books have now begun to arrive at the California Institution for Women (CIW) in Chino. Organized by the Justice Work Group and the Department of African American Studies, the Bruin Prison Book Drive placed donation bins in academic departments and residential units as well as hosted poetry slam events.”

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/dept/faculty/campus-adds-1-500-books-to-library-in-women-s-prison

Berkeley: Weeding the Worst Library Books

From The New Yorker

” Last summer, in Berkeley, California, librarians pulled roughly forty thousand books off the shelves of the public library and carted them away. The library’s director, Jeff Scott, announced that his staff had “deaccessioned” texts that weren’t regularly checked out. But the protesters who gathered on the library’s front steps to decry what became known as “Librarygate” preferred a different term: purged.”

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/weeding-the-worst-library-books

L.A. Public Library unveils new card designed by Shepard Fairey

From LA Times

” The Los Angeles Public Library seriously upped its hipster credentials when it unveiled on Tuesday its new library card co-designed by L.A. street artist Shepard Fairey.
Fairey’s design, which he created with artist Cleon Peterson, depicts the historic Central Library in downtown in a white, green and black motif that echoes Fairey’s signature poster style.The design is based on an illustration created to promote the Library Foundation of Los Angeles’ Young Literati annual toast fundraiser. The Central Library is celebrating its 90th anniversary this year.”

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/culture/la-et-cm-public-library-card-shepard-fairey-20160419-story.html

Petaluma programming club making coders out of kids

From Argus Courier

“On an unseasonably hot Wednesday afternoon, 18 kids between the ages of 9 and 13 sat in a square of tables with laptops in front of them and a copy of the book “Computational Fairy Tales” by their sides. Despite the heat and lure of video games, they listened to Candace Stump as she asked them to explain an algorithm.”

http://www.petaluma360.com/entertainment/5523542-181/petaluma-programming-club-making-coders

Lodi Public Library takes another step into digital age

From Lodi News

“Now, library patrons will have access to thousands of downloadable books — fiction, nonfiction and children’s stories — thanks to Lodi Public Library’s new eBook program.“It’s a great boon for libraries in the system,” said library director Dean Gualco.That system is quite a simple concept. Library card holders can log into the digital library at http://library.lodi.gov/eBooks. From there, they can checkout up to eight eBooks and eAudiobooks at a time.Downloading a book will put a file on their computer, smartphone, tablet or Kindle-Nook eReader. The books have a lifespan of three weeks, at which time the file automatically erases itself.”

http://www.lodinews.com/news/article_42e0dfd0-0b7f-11e6-b0a2-93656db15989.html