San Mateo : In the digital age, will libraries be obsolete?

From San Mateo Daily Journal

” In the digital age, will libraries be obsolete? Absolutely not, according to local tech and library experts who discussed this issue last week at the San Mateo Public Library. The panel included Dan Clancy, vice president of engineering, Nextdoor and former director of Google Book project (see recent Atlantic Monthly); Cameron Johnson, director of product innovation, Netflix and San Carlos councilman; David Weekly, manager of Rapid Rollout Lab for Google access; Karen Kuklin, Gensler architect; and Karen Schneider, dean of the Sonoma State University Library. Moderator was Greg Lucas, state librarian of California and former Sacramento Bureau Chief, San Francisco Chronicle.In fact, the panel agreed that libraries are more important than ever in the digital age. They offer space for people to come together, a need more relevant today than ever before. It’s the place where various segments of the community gather. Libraries provide essential access to information in a public space open to all, especially those who cannot afford an internet connection at home. It’s the ideal place to experience technology and to provide educational opportunities outside the classroom.”

http://www.smdailyjournal.com/articles/opinions/2017-05-08/in-the-digital-age-will-libraries-be-obsolete/1776425179904.html

Solano County Library wins NASA grant

From The Reporter

” Solano County Library shot for the stars and brought home a grant from NASA Monday.The library system was one of 75 across the United States selected for the NASA@ My Library program, which promotes learning opportunities in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields at libraries.“We’re just really excited and it’s super competitive,” Jennifer La Riviere, a young adult library associate at the Suisun City Library, said. “And so we weren’t expecting to get in.”Thanks to NASA and the American Library Association, Solano library staff will have access to a network of experts in astronomy and space exploration, new teaching resources and two STEM facilitation kits put together by NASA scientists.”

http://www.thereporter.com/article/NG/20170508/NEWS/170509888

Compton Hosted Special Concert with Yo Yo, Anthony Lewis and More

From EURweb

” The Los Angeles County Library presented the inaugural “Compton Turns the Table” a free live concert on Saturday, May 6, 2017, outdoors at the Compton Civic Plaza, located at 2015 South Willowbrook Drive.Despite the various weather patterns, several hundred people were in attendance. The event started at exactly 3PM, with a Red Carpet hosted by Melanie Eke. Ms. Eke interviewed the five students who were to showcased their DJ skills on the turntables. DJ Yagn Yagn, DJ Sol, DJ Wave Reckz, DJ Daydreamer, DJ Paige and DJ Pricetag. Also interviewed were the special guest performers new pop artist sensation Kay Dee, rapper Lee Laamaj, R&B singer Anthony Lewis and Hip Hop legend and actress Yo Yo who was the headliner. ”

http://www.eurweb.com/2017/05/compton-hosted-special-concert-with-yo-yo-anthony-lewis-kay-dee-and-lee-laamaj/#

At San Diego’s libraries, you can check out bike tools, language classes and Wi-Fi hotspots

From The San Diego Union-Tribune

” Maybe it’s a photo from your family trip to Disneyland, circa 1971. The one where you are rocking a suede headband and a Donny Osmond T-shirt. Or that Beta tape of your 21st birthday party, the one whose contents will be revealed on a need-to-know basis. Or your battered cassette copy of the one album Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks recorded as a duo, which is now selling for $100 on Amazon.These and other treasures can be saved from the technology graveyard thanks to the Memory Lab at the La Jolla-Riford Library, where patrons can use a host of gadgets to turn their various tapes, photos and discs to digital formats.”

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/entertainment/things-to-do/sd-me-test-library-20170506-story.html

Stockton library branch reopens after 7 years

From KCRA

” City of Stockton library cardholders can now check out new books and use new computers at the Fair Oaks Library, which reopened Wednesday after seven years.Hundreds lined up outside the building Wednesday for a chance to see the revived library.“I just remember the fact that when I was a child and my actual mother, coming here just to read books with me,” recalled Markis Sosa, who fought vigorously with other community members to have the library reopened.Books were just one part of the equation for Sosa.“I also have a speech impediment (and) I was able to somewhat overcome that,” he said.In addition to providing Sosa an educational resource, the library proved to be much more.”

http://www.kcra.com/article/stockton-library-branch-reopens-after-7-years/9634585

San Bernardino County: Seed libraries play a growing role in the future of crops

From The Sun

” Seed libraries are sprouting up all over Southern California.The intent is to promote gardening and to “plant-it-forward” by preserving seeds either native to Southern California or ones adapted to its environment.One of the newest is the San Bernardino County Regional Seed Library at the Chino Basin Water Conservation District in Montclair. Here, visitors learn how to obtain seeds for flowers, fruits, vegetables and more. A key component is returning seeds, so the process continues to expand and grow.”

http://www.sbsun.com/lifestyle/20170512/seed-libraries-play-a-growing-role-in-the-future-of-crops

Oceanside: Letters from war shown at library

From The San Diego Union-Tribune

” An exhibit showing the letters that soldiers have written home from the battlefield opened at the Oceanside Public Library.The exhibit, “War Comes Home: The Legacy,” displays letters dating back more than 150 years to the Civil War and covers many of the major wars the U.S. has been involved in since then.The letters are being shown as part of the War Comes Home initiative, to give an up-close glimpse into the lives of troops deployed during wartime and their thoughts about war and the return to civilian life. The idea is to foster a greater understanding of the issues facing veterans returning home from war.“The exhibit explores shared themes of wartime separation, transition to life back at home and costs of war,” said Kristine Moralez, who is coordinating the exhibit at the library.The exhibition is based on collections at the Center for American War Letters at Chapman University, which houses more than 70,000 letters from soldiers and their families spanning 230 years, and is presented by Exhibit Envoy in partnership with Cal Humanities and the California State Library. ”

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/communities/north-county/sd-no-warletters-20170428-story.html